Chickens roosting. But also angsty.

alexstrick:


It was morning in Baghdad, we were carousing,
stirred by a white face and deep-black eyes.
In a house where glasses are akin
to stars whirling in the dark among drinking companions.
Our cupbearer mixed wine or served it pure;
what a wonderful wine when mixed!
Saffron powder was sprinkled over us,
above our heads crowns of golden jasmine.
I was still drinking when sunset arrived,
between melodies of castanets and lute.



'Stars whirling in the Dark' by Muti‘ ibn Iyas (704–85) from a new book released recently by Harvard University Press.

alexstrick:

It was morning in Baghdad, we were carousing,

stirred by a white face and deep-black eyes.

In a house where glasses are akin

to stars whirling in the dark among drinking companions.

Our cupbearer mixed wine or served it pure;

what a wonderful wine when mixed!

Saffron powder was sprinkled over us,

above our heads crowns of golden jasmine.

I was still drinking when sunset arrived,

between melodies of castanets and lute.

'Stars whirling in the Dark' by Muti‘ ibn Iyas (704–85) from a new book released recently by Harvard University Press.
jothelibrarian:

erikkwakkel:

uispeccoll:

clirhiddencollections:

vintagelibraries:

Men and women looking through the card catalogues at the Library of Congress, 1941.

A visual reminder to be grateful for OPACs!

Wow, this really gives you a sense of scale.

This is how scholars found the literature they needed: by going through alphabetical card catalogues - one on author, one on subject, containing thousands and thousands of cards. The bigger the library the more cards. The Library of Congress is obviously a sizable library…

WOW! I remember the old card catalogue at the Bodleian, snaking around the corridor of the New Library… but seeing the Library of Congress catalogue in one room… wow.

Someone should write a song about card catalogues.

jothelibrarian:

erikkwakkel:

uispeccoll:

clirhiddencollections:

vintagelibraries:

Men and women looking through the card catalogues at the Library of Congress, 1941.

A visual reminder to be grateful for OPACs!

Wow, this really gives you a sense of scale.

This is how scholars found the literature they needed: by going through alphabetical card catalogues - one on author, one on subject, containing thousands and thousands of cards. The bigger the library the more cards. The Library of Congress is obviously a sizable library…

WOW! I remember the old card catalogue at the Bodleian, snaking around the corridor of the New Library… but seeing the Library of Congress catalogue in one room… wow.

Someone should write a song about card catalogues.

(via alexstrick)

earth-song:

It’s Ridiculous How Much This Flower Looks Like A Monkey

It’s not really a mystery how this rare purple flower, called the Monkey Orchid, got its name. We thought you should have a chance to check out the striking resemblance for yourself (via Incredible Things).  

In case you’re curious, here are some other interesting facts about the Monkey Orchid:

  • It grows at elevations 1000-2000 feet above sea level
  • It’s found in the forests of southeastern Ecuador and Peru
  • It smells like oranges  
  • Its scientific name is Dracula simia

Read more

(via authenticfauxhemian)

Kabul, Afghanistan.